The toolkit will always be in process, based on feedback from you and others about content, ease of use, and its contribution to your facilitation of bibliotherapy. As editors of this toolkit, our aim is that your use will be efficient and clear. We invite you to return again and again. Please send us your comments and suggestions for future additions.

First Time User

We suggest that you move through the toolkit to acquaint yourself with its content.

Second and Later Users

Use the links that will most quickly lead you to the specific pages you desire or need.
Here is an overview of the Table of Contents, followed by an Annotated Table of Contents. Each of these headings can be found on the Home Page for ease of use.
Welcome to the Web Site – see Home Page
Foreword – Ken Calman
NHS and Lapidus Scotland Connection – Ann Wales and Larry Butler
How To Use The Tool Kit – Ted Bowman and Larry Butler, editors
About Bibliotherapy– Definitions and Discussion
Brief Examples of Bibliotherapy Practices
Group Facilitation
Facilitating Bibliotherapy
17 Examples by Scottish Practitioners of Bibliotherapy
References and Resources
Research on Bibliotherapy
Some Guidelines About Copyright And Use Of Materials
List of Contributors

Annotated Table of Contents

NHS and Lapidus Scotland Connection – by Ann Wales and Larry Butler
This toolkit is a collaboration between NHS Scotland and Lapidus Scotland. Here are background and overview comments from two of the key collaborators:

About Bibliotherapy- Definitions and Discussion – Several definitions of bibliotherapy can be found at this link. More than one is offered because of the rich diversity of bibliotherapy practices. Use these definitions as you shape your own practice or to advocate to supervisors, funders, and colleagues for expanded uses of bibliotherapy

Brief Examples of Bibliotherapy Practices – click this link to find a list of examples of bibliotherapy practices in diverse settings around the globe. The purpose of this section is to stimulate your consideration of creative approaches to bibliotherapy. Send the editors other examples. This link will be subject to regular updates.

Group Facilitation – Use this link to find pages of core principles and practices when leading groups, whatever the group purpose and process: support, reading, therapeutic, writing, or groups utilizing a curriculum.

Facilitating Bibliotherapy – The use of literary resources for personal growth or healing is called bibliotherapy. When drawing on reading, writing or story-telling as practices in a group, the facilitation requires attention to matters found in this packet.

17 Examples by Scottish Practitioners of Bibliotherapy – Click this link for access to a rich potpourri of examples of practices of bibliotherapy by Scottish practitioners. Further, their emails are available for continuing conversations. The titles are suggestive of the setting, participants, or the group process.

References and Resources – selected bibliographies will be found at this link. Send the editors other resources, as this link will be regularly updated.

Research on Bibliotherapy – at this link, you will find a provocative essay by James Hawkins about current research trends regarding bibliotherapy.

Some Guidelines About Copyright And Use Of Materials
List of Contributors

Tool Meta

Contributors: Larry Butler,Ted Bowman
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